Workplace Training

Avoid Big Fails on the Training Front

Organizations spend millions of dollars every year on training. Unfortunately, many of these training initiatives fail. While Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook may embrace the motto “move fast and break things,” failing isn’t always good for business. Indeed, failed training programs can lead to lost revenue and talent. While it is difficult to determine the total value of these losses, a 2016 article in the Harvard Business Review reported, “American companies spend enormous amounts of money on employee training and education—$160 billion in the United States and close to $356 billion globally in 2015 alone—but they are not getting a good return on their investment. For the most part, the learning doesn’t lead to better organizational performance, because people soon revert to their old ways of doing things.” Today’s post outlines just some of the  most common reasons workplace training programs fail and explores how to avoid big fails and big losses Continue reading

2016 Top Workplace Training Stories

Over the past twelve months, eLeaP has posted on many subjects concerning workplace training, eLearning and mLearning. From time to time, we have also investigated breaking news stories and explored their impact on workplace training. This week’s end-of-year post recaps the year’s top stories in workplace training with an eye to analyzing how the will likely continue to effect workplace training over the coming twelve months. Continue reading

How Training Can Help Crack the Glass Ceiling

Every year, more women crash through the glass ceiling. Of course, women at the top are still far from the majority. In most companies, women represent only a fraction of executives. For example, women hold only 4.2% of CEO positions in the 500 largest U.S. companies. This raises the obvious question: What continues to prevent women from crashing through the glass ceiling? Continue reading

Train Your Volunteers with eLearning

It’s that time of year–the time of year when people’s charitable spirit spikes. Indeed, for most nonprofits, the Thanksgiving to New Years stretch is critical. It is when most donations (money and good) come in and when one is most likely to find people eager to pitch in to help too. But there’s a problem. While anyone running a food bank, women’s shelter, or soup kitchen needs all hands on deck, volunteers can also be a liability. In essence, it’s like bringing dozens and even hundreds of entirely untrained employees on board. Continue reading

Using Fitbit-like Devices in Workplace Training

Wearable technology is becoming increasingly prevalent in our everyday lives and in 2017, there is good reason to believe that this trend will continue. Among the most ubiquitous wearable technologies is the Fitbit. Easy enough for a child or 90-year-old technophobe to use, the device not only motivates people to move more all day long but also helps people keep track of their health vitals. From heart rate to sleep patterns to daily steps, the Fitbit knows exactly what you’re up to. Now imagine if it could be used as a way to deliver educational and training materials too? Continue reading

“Show, Don’t Tell,” with Articulate Storyline 2

If you’ve ever taken a writing class, you’ll already know, the number one rule of good writing is “show, don’t tell.” Indeed, most great writers and experienced professors of writing will tell you that when you show your readers something, you are more likely to captivate them than when you tell your readers something. Why? Because when you show something to readers, they are more likely to enter the scene with you. In short, they are likely to be able to see and feel the experience you seek to convey. Not surprisingly, the “show, don’t tell” rule also holds true when it comes to creating compelling online training courses. Continue reading

Top Challenges Facing Small Business Owners

Running a small business can be the most liberating experience in the world. Whether you’re a one-man or one-woman operation, a family business, or an energetic young start-up spearheaded by a group of friends, small business life has much to offer and many rewards both in terms of professional growth and on the financial front. But this doesn’t mean running a small business is easy. Small business owners also face many challenges unique to the scale of their enterprises from founder and client dependence to cash flow issues to fatigue to growth management issues. Continue reading

Training and Trust in Small Franchises

Fact: One of the top reasons employees go on the job market is lack of trust in their senior management.

Fact: Only 40% of employees say they trust their management.

Fact: The cost of employee turnover can be as high as 150% of an employee’s annual salary.

Fact: Training is associated with increased employee trust and in turn with increased employee retention rates. Continue reading

No Business is too Small for Training

While large enterprises typically have well-established training programs, small business often offer little or no training to employees at all. In reality, whether you’re running a global enterprise with employees scattered around the globe or a mom-and-pop business in your backyard with just a few employees, training matters. The problem is that many small business owners falsely believe they lack the financial resources and time to offer comprehensive training. In fact, with a learning management system, training is not only affordable to even the smallest businesses but also can help small business owners save money and engage in manageable growth over time.  Continue reading

How to Work with and for Difficult People

If you’re like most Americans, you’re likely looking forward to casting your vote in November and hoping it counts. If you happen to work at the White House, however, you’re likely not only looking forward to casting your vote but also bracing yourself for what promises to be a major change. After all, in November, you’ll be doing more than casting a vote for the next President—you’ll also be electing the person with whom you may end up working for the next four to eight years. This brings us to the topic of today’s post—how to work with and for difficult people. Continue reading