Harassment Training

Diversity and Respect Are Also Compliance Issues

Everyone is concerned about compliance. What some managers fail to realize is that diversity and respect in the workplace are also compliance issues. Indeed, if you want to ensure you’re in full compliance, it is important to also take diversity issues into account. From taking steps to prevent and address sexual and racial harassment to ensuring everyone in your workplace feels included whatever their gender identity, diversity and compliance go hand in hand. Continue reading

Required Sexual Harassment Training for New York Employees: What to Know

On April 12, 2018, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law the 2019 New York State budget. In this budget, a new law was created for all employers across the State regarding sexual harassment training. This law became effective on October 9, 2018. The new law requires, in short, that employers provide annual training on anti-harassment and adopt written policies and procedures on the prevention of sexual harassment in the workplace.

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How to Proactively Protect Against Workplace Violence

What Is Workplace Violence?

Workplace violence has become a huge topic of discussion in the U.S. When we think about workplace violence, we most often think about those high-profile incidents, many of which involve active shooters. While workplace shootings are a component of workplace violence, that’s not all that falls into this category. Continue reading

#MeToo, Executive Training, and Employment Practices Liability: What To Know

Changes In Insurance After #MeToo

According to a recent article on Forbes.com, more CEOs and top company executives are being forced into corporate training programs following the #MeToo movement. The reason isn’t necessarily because they’re becoming more enlightened on topics of sexual harassment and hoping to better themselves. Instead, more carriers that offer Employment Practices Liability (EPL) insurance are demanding it. Continue reading

Essential Training Courses for HR Staff

Earlier this week, Uber, the popular ride-sharing company that has recently been in the news for a series of high-profile HR errors, was once again making headlines. After news broke in early February that the company had routinely failed to respond to sexual harassment and gender discrimination incidents at its headquarters in California, former Google executive, Liane Hornsey, was brought on board to help Uber manage its brewing internal HR crisis. Since arriving, Hornsey has focused on doing something that Uber does in fact do well: generating data. What she has discovered so far has mostly confirmed what was already suspected. The company’s tech staff and leadership are mostly White and male. But Hornsey has drawn attention to another problem too. Continue reading