Learning Innovation Part I: Setting the Stage

As learning professionals, you are already all too familiar with the pressure you feel to be increasingly innovative in your work. But have you ever stepped back to think about what innovation really is, and what you can do to boost your own innovation? Many people consider innovation to be synonymous with creativity. While being highly creative can help with some aspects of innovation, there’s much more to it than that. In this article I set the stage about innovation as a lead-in for helping you become a more innovative learning professional. Continue reading

Project Management for Learning Professionals: The Charter

Each learning initiative, program, course, or module developed in your company’s learning department should be thought of a discreet project that needs to be well-managed in order to achieve the desired outcomes. The place to start when a new learning project comes your way is with a document called a Project Charter. Getting this right from the outset will make your life a whole lot easier as the project progresses through its various stages and phases. Continue reading

The Scientific Method in Learning Initiatives, Part II

In the first part of this series, I made a very bold statement: To the extent that you aren’t using the scientific method as part of your learning work, you’re missing out on the true power of learning to have profound impacts on business results. Using the scientific method in your efforts to design and deploy effective learning programs is the surest way to get superior results, but very few learning professionals see it that way. Continue reading

The Scientific Method in Learning Initiatives, Part I

Based on the title of this article, you may well be wondering what in the world the scientific method has to do with your learning efforts. I boldly assert that the scientific method has everything to do with your learning initiatives. In fact, to the extent that you aren’t using the scientific method as part of your learning work, you’re missing out on the true power of learning to have profound impacts on business results. Continue reading

Knowledge Transfer in a Contingent Workforce

As discussed in our recently published white paper, Measuring the Impact of Contingent Workers, contingent workers constitute an ever-growing portion of the workforce. While large numbers of contingent workers can place unanticipated strains on an organization, they also bring new resources into an organization, albeit ones that can be difficult to capture. One notable gain is spillover knowledge and skills and nowhere is this more apparent than with IT workers. The question is how to capture this spillover or knowledge transfer and use it to support in-house training efforts? Continue reading

Blended Learning: When and How to Use it

In today’s increasingly digital world, it’s all too easy to just assume that eLearning is always the way to go. But it’s worth remembering that the choice you face isn’t a black-and-white, either/or choice between eLearning and traditional learning. They can be mixed together as well, which is called blended learning. And sometimes that’s the best choice of all. What drives the choice between eLearning, traditional learning, or a mix of both? Continue reading

The ROI of Learning Part 5: The True Costs of Learning

In my last article I went over some actual examples of how to calculate both a benefit/cost ratio and an ROI for a learning initiative that was focused on boosting retention (reducing turnover). I mentioned in that article that it’s important to make sure you cover your bases when determining the cost of learning. In this article, I want to spell that out a little more clearly because there’s a lot to account for. Continue reading

The ROI of Training Contingent Workers

Is it worth while investing money in contingent workers? If so, how much? If a contingent worker will only be on staff for two weeks and their level of responsibility is low, it follows that one’s training cost should remain as low as possible. By contrast, a worker brought on board for a short period of time who will have a high level of responsibility may be worth investing in. Deciding how much time and money to invest in training contingent workers, however, remains a challenge. Continue reading